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Responsive Web Design


About the Podcast

These are all the episodes related to Media and publishing in the Responsive Web Design Podcast.

(If you’d like, you can peruse the entire podcast archive.)

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  1. The accessibility group at the UK Home Office created a set of posters to explain accessibility from a design perspective. Karwai Pun tells us how these posters raise awareness.

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  2. The Chosen presents cabinet nominees in an easy-to-read trading card format. Jessica Huseman and Rob Weychert describe how they developed this informative site for ProPublica.

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  3. Episode 119: UXmatters

    Pabini Gabriel-Petit tells us about the responsive redesign of long-time user experience design focused publication, UXmatters.

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  4. Episode 118: MuckRock

    Did you know you can file a Freedom of Information Act request right from your phone? Michael Morisy and Allan Lasser explain how MuckRock makes that possible.

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  5. In the latest episode of the responsive web typography podcast, we talk to José Scaglione and Aaron Mentele about independent type foundry TypeTogether.

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  6. Variable fonts are coming. How will it change the web design and development process? Tim Brown and Bram Stein explain how variable fonts will work and what you can do with them now.

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  7. Paul Gee and Rob Wooten describe the process for designing and building a family of websites for the twelve medical journals published by the JAMA Network.

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  8. Episode 114: DI

    Johannes Holmertz and Ulf Högberg describe the work-in-progress redesign of Swedish financial news platform DI.se.

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  9. Episode 110: BBC Sport

    Al Jones and Joe Walker from BBC Sport describe how rolling out a new responsive website has been based on components from their global experience language.

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  10. Gadi Lahav from the Financial Times shares data that shows every second they made the site faster translates to a 5% percent increase in engagement, which means millions in subscriptions and ad sales.

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  11. Episode 106: Instant.me

    Instant.me obsessively covers the lives of digital stars. Kirstin Benson and Neil Renicker tell us how they developed a responsive site and CMS that lives up to the brand promise.

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  12. Don’t believe that a beautiful, image-led publication can work well on smaller form factors? Paul Pensom and Patrick Burgoyne from Creative Review talk grids and type—and content management too.

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  13. Michal Skrzypek and Kate Tetreault describe how the iterative testing culture at America’s Test Kitchen helped them work more collaboratively during a responsive design.

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  14. A mobile-first perspective is also a performance-first perspective at Vox Media. Dan Chilton and Guillermo Esteves talk about how they helped build a culture of performance.

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  15. How many economists read American Economic Association journals on their phone? Jenna Kutz and Matt Griffin describe a process that makes the AEA more accessible to everyone.

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  16. Episode 87: WBUR

    Who hasn’t fantasized about (and feared) a gut renovation of their website? Tiffany Campbell and Scott Dasse describe the redesign and relaunch of a beta site for WBUR.

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  17. The relaunch of Curbed includes an updated CMS platform and a new brand identity. Lauren Rabaino and Yesenia Perez-Cruz tell us this redesign reaches readers wherever they are.

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  18. Think a small publisher can’t afford to go responsive? They can’t afford not to. Brian Halweil and Lauren Wilson talk about the redesign of the Edible publications in the New York area.

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  19. If you like podcasts and responsive design, you might like us—but you will LOVE this episode with Kurt Kohlstedt and Andrea Tomingas from 99% Invisible.

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  20. Authentic Jobs advertises open positions for web designers and developers, so it only makes sense that they would want to go responsive. Cameron Moll and Adam Spooner tell us how.

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  21. If you’ve ever looked up dictionary definitions just for fun you will love the new responsive Merriam-Webster site. Lisa Schneider and Ringo Lertprecha tell us about their process.

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  22. How does the MIT Technology Review meet people where they are? Erik Pelletier and Tito Bottitta tell us their responsive redesign helped them adapt to the needs of readers and advertisers on the web.

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  23. A true multi-platform strategy for Science Friday means responsive web design. Christian Skotte and Mark Llobrera describe a content-first process based on why users visit the site.

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  24. Serious Eats is the best and now it’s responsive so it’s even better. Tracie Lee and Paul Cline tell us how sketching, design components, and a decoupled CMS made a redesign possible.

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  25. How do you provide customer support for a largely mobile audience? With responsive design! Justin Lucas tells us about the redesign of help.npr.org.

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  26. Episode 59: The Toast

    We love The Toast so much we wanted to make it better. So we redesigned it! Eileen Webb and Jeff Eaton are here to represent the rest of the team who made this project go so smoothly.

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  27. What if site speed were actually a life-or-death matter? Kim Conger from Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty worked with Dan Mall and Tim Kadlec to make performance the top priority.

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  28. Think no one wants to read long articles on their phone? Ryan Essmaker and Brad Smith tell us The Great Discontent readers spend more time on their phones, so responsive design makes sense.

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  29. Episode 53: ProPublica

    Do you need to make your entire site responsive from the start? David Sleight from ProPublica explains that starting with individual feature stories is a safe way to experiment.

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  30. Episode 48: OZY

    Most companies have an existing website they want to make responsive. Ryan Mannion from OZY tells us about building and maintaining a site that’s been responsive from the start.

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  31. One of the most innovative digital publishers is 150-year-old The Atlantic. Libby Bawcombe and Betsy Ebersole explain how responsive design serves their customers who visit on both mobile and desktop.

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  32. The BBC has spent the past four years developing their Responsive News site. Niko Vijayaratnam and John Cleveley provide an in-depth look at the process required to deliver this massive project.

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  33. Game of Thrones’ rabid fan base means lots of social sharing on mobile. Joey Marburger and Shelly Tan describe their process for creating a responsive interactive feature for The Washington Post.

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  34. Episode 38: Wired

    The Wired redesign has it all: a new process based on prototyping, fresh design, structure, and publishing tools, increased ad inventory and viewability, and team-wide focus on speed.

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  35. Episode 32: MTV

    A responsive redesign of MTV News resulted in a 570 percent increase in referrals from social, nearly tripling their traffic. Ryan Shafer tells us how it changed their process at MTV.com.

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  36. The A.V. Club, The Onion, and ClickHole are truly digital publishing brands. Kelly Pratt and Kristi-Lynn Jacovino explain how they made them responsive, running off a single codebase.

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  37. Sixty-five percent of Outside Online readers are, well, mobile. Todd Hodgson and TJ Pitre show how a responsive redesign can deliver improved performance on a tight budget.

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  38. Episode 25: NPR

    NPR famously publishes to many different platforms. Patrick Cooper and Scott Stroud explain why they went responsive: to get more value from their limited resources.

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  39. The interwoven historical perspectives shown in Lapham’s Quarterly are perfect for the web. Michelle Legro and Rebecca Smith explain how a new CMS and editorial workflow support a responsive design.

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  40. Episode 20: Nieman Lab

    Some large companies go responsive at scale—what about sites built by one person? At the Nieman Journalism Lab at Harvard, Josh Benton wears many hats: editor, writer, designer, developer, even QA.

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  41. Episode 18: Beatport Pro

    More than five million DJs discover new music using Beatport Pro. Robert Petro and Nikki Lee explain why a responsive solution that works across platforms was a no-brainer for their relaunch.

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  42. Episode 17: Quartz

    How do you improve on a news site that’s already successful and already minimalist? Zach Seward and Daniel Lee explain that a mobile first mindset helped refine and enhance the redesign of qz.com—for both users and advertisers.

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  43. Episode 15: The Guardian

    For some organizations, “mobile” means a website that works on tablets and smartphones. For Alex Breuer of The Guardian, mobile means challenging editorial conventions and rethinking the fundamental form of a 200-year-old publication.

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  44. Episode 13: Vox Media

    You’d learn a lot if your first responsive project was for SB Nation, one of the most popular sports sites on the web with more than 70 million unique users. For Trei Brundrett, Chief Product Officer for Vox Media, going responsive means iteratively improving an entire network of media brands.

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  45. Episode 9: Condé Nast

    Publishers must take advantage of increased traffic on mobile. But how? Scher Foord of Condé Nast explains how rolling out responsive redesigns across all their magazine brands helps them adapt to changing consumer behavior and meet advertiser demand.

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  46. From the LA Times, Megan Garvey and Emily Smith tell us their responsive redesign delivers an improved experience for users, offers advertisers a better environment for their campaigns, and gave their journalists a morale boost with a website they could be proud of.

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  47. As the first major site to go responsive, it’s only fitting that The Boston Globe is the first episode of our podcast. We talk with Miranda Mulligan about the politics between the newsroom and the design team, and how responsive design brought them together.

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